21 Sep 2023

Exploring the intersection of art and technology

In a conversation with artist and technologist Harry Yeff (known as Reeps100), he shares his unique perspective. Harry is the driving force behind Studio R100, a studio that blends his musical and compositional work with a focus on emerging tech and experimental projects, including machine learning, VR, and augmented reality. 

Here is the video: 

And here’s a brief summary of what Yeff spoke about: 

The role of art in the modern world 

Addressing the purpose of art in the modern world, Yeff emphasizes its power as a communication tool. In an era marked by bias and polarization, he believes that art's strength lies in making crucial ideas experiential. The most impactful art, according to Yeff, communicates vital concepts, working in collaboration with academics and thought leaders to ensure that people truly grasp the world's complexities. 

Art and tech: A growing confluence 

Yeff discusses the growing synergy between art and technology. He highlights the unprecedented reach that social media and algorithmic fluency provide. Beyond traditional art spaces, Yeff believes that showcasing diverse perspectives in less conventional artistic contexts can foster new ideas and drive practical change by altering habits and opinions. 

The influence of artificial intelligence on art 

According to Yeff, we're entering an age dominated by visual communication. He envisions a future where having an idea is sufficient to convey it, revolutionising the way we create and share media. While this transformation presents challenges, it also democratizes artistic expression, making visionary capabilities accessible to a broader range of people, including youth, neurodiverse individuals, and minorities. 

AI vs. human artists 

Yeff clarifies that AI is not currently replacing human artists. All art produced today remains fundamentally human-generated. While AI augments artistic processes and introduces new methods, it still requires human collaboration. This shift may alter artistic careers and approaches but is likely to lead to entirely new forms of artistic contribution, which Harry finds exciting. 

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